Saturday, November 1, 2008

Second review - Strangers in Death

Ever noticed that if you spend alot of time online, and you don't read for a while, you forget how good it feels to polish off a good book? Like stretching a really relaxing, nice muscle. I don't know, maybe I'm weird (well, of course I am, but that's besides the point) but it's... nice.

Anyway. Time for my second review. Oh, shoot, I need a picture. Be right back.

Strangers in Death by J. D. Robb

I love murder mysteries. I read a lot of YA books, but I do so love a good murder mystery. I know, I'm twisted, but I guess it's that same part of me that loves vampire books.

The best of the best of murder mysteries is the In Death series by J. D. Robb. They are adult books, so I wouldn't recommend them to everybody, but they're pretty clean, except that sometimes she gets a little detailed about the murders. That's to be expected, though.

One warning. There are thirty books in this series. If you want a complete list, here's the link. CAUTION: Don't scroll up or down or you'll get a small spoiler. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_Death#Books So while these books are a commitment, they are so worth it. I'm addicted to them. This last one was five hundred pages (large print) and I finished it in one night, that's how addicting they are. And because I'm just brilliant, I read it on Halloween. When I was alone in the house that wasn't mine because I was baby-sitting and my charge was out trick-or-treating, and then he almost immediately went to sleep so I was again, basically alone.

Summary (from the back of the book): Technology may be different in 2060 New York, yet the city is still a place of great divides. As ever, some murders receive more attention than others, especially when the victim is a prominent businessman, found tied to his bed and strangled with cords of black velvet. While people of the city are talking about it, those close to Thomas Anders aren't so eager to do the same. Evidence suggests that the victim didn't struggle and that the killer was someone known to the family, but everyone's alibi checks out. Was this a crime of passion or a meticulously planned execution?

My review: Ooh, I get all shivery when I think about it. This was so good. Like I said, best of the best. I always try to guess who the murderer is by around the third chapter and I'm usually never right. Never. Out of thirty books, I've maybe gotten it right twice. But still it's fun.

I also love that the main character is a woman police officer, a lieutenant, actually, and that she is in a successful marriage. Honestly, the relationship between Eve Dallas, the main character, and Roarke who as far as I know, doesn't have a first name (long story, you'll have to read the books to find out), her husband is one of the single most beautiful love stories I've ever read. At one point, when she's discussing the case with him and she says,

"So, you're dead asleep, and you get a call. Something terrible's happened, and I'm dead. What do you do?"

It took him a moment to quell the terror, to ignore the small, dark place inside him that feared getting that call every day.

I almost started crying when I read that, because it's so sweet.

Conclusion: This is a great book, definitely worth reading, and I sincerely hope there are many, many more. This is one of those books where you find yourself reading lines out loud because it's just so darn good.

And that's my review, so, until next time, happy reading, leave a comment if you want, and come back soon to see what I've done with the place.
-Yours, Laina.

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